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Dealing With Family Problems During Recovery

Bringing Up Old Feelings

At some point during the addiction recovery process, things will get very real. Understanding one’s addiction will eventually require some painful self-reflection. You’ll need to look at what caused you to succumb to the temptation that ultimately led to your addiction. Being honest with oneself is the only way to treat the root causes of your addiction. Family problems during recovery are very common and both the person with the addiction and their family members must approach recovery with their hearts and minds open. As you look back on these things, you might find that your addiction was caused by any number of things. Here are some of the more prevalent influences:

  • Rejection – either by a parent, a family member or partner
  • A general lack of love – being part of a family or a relationship where you don’t feel loved might play a role
  • A lack of understanding – especially true among younger addicts as they struggle to transition from those awkward teen years where they don’t fit in socially
  • A lack of attention – parents who aren’t actively involved in their children’s lives effectively give up their role as parents to the child’s peers, doing anything to feel welcome

Dealing With The Things That Drove You To Addiction

While the above points are just a few examples, there’s more to addiction than certain needs not being met. In many cases, those suffering from addiction are dealing with feelings of inadequacy or have self-esteem issues. Under severe conditions, it’s not uncommon to look for an escape. People with these characteristics are especially sensitive to verbal abuse. Continued verbal abuse can play a big role in self-esteem. In cases where love is absent from the home, a divorce might trigger a profound reaction and conceivably, drive one to the “escape” offered by substances. A failed marriage or romantic relationship can be another trigger. Physical or sexual abuse can be one of the most powerful triggers of addiction.

These events, as tragic as they might be, are usually not enough to plunge someone into addiction. There are deeper issues, sometimes going back decades, that have torn down the will power, self-esteem, and self-control that most people possess. But there is a way to address these issues.

Addiction therapy programs in Orange County, CA provides a safe and structured setting for the family unit to work through past and current issues. There are many programs for the individual struggling with substance abuse, but family therapy helps loved ones understand addiction as a disease. Family therapy also breaks down boundaries of communication and instills new, effective means of dealing with problems together.

Co-occurring Disorders

Mental health issues, large or small, can play a role in one’s addiction. While the person suffering from addiction might not even be aware that they’re suffering from some sort of mental issue, it’s important to look at this during recovery. Addressing co-occurring disorders with dual diagnosis treatment is essential to a proper recovery plan as ignoring the issue is a recipe for relapse. A proper substance abuse treatment facility will conduct a diagnosis to determine whether or not any existing mental illness issues exist and develop a treatment plan accordingly.

Life’s Stresses

One of the family problems during recovery is understanding that other family members might think everyone is capable of managing stress in the same way. The individual suffering from addiction feels compelled to abuse when stress levels reach a threshold that is almost always far lower than that of someone without the disease. As such, it’s tempting for parents to tell their kids to “suck it up,” but the reality is that no amount of tough love will change how someone with addiction copes with emotions or stress. The truth is that everyone manages stress differently. Beating addiction will require re-training of the individual’s brain to cope with stress, channel their energy, and resolve conflicts.

Escape From Reality

One of the saddest things we hear from those in recovery is that their addiction served as an escape. In some cases, it was to escape from a hostile home setting. In others, it was living in a town with no opportunity. For others, it was physical or sexual abuse. For people in these settings, addiction provided a way to cope with the harsh realities of their daily lives.

Family members were either uneducated, disinterested, or unequipped to counsel or comfort their loved one before they started abusing substances. Others turn to addiction after major setbacks in their life. These might include divorce, failed romance, or job loss. Depression, if not treated quickly, can turn into something far more serious and ugly.

Dealing With Family Problems During Recovery

Who’s really to blame for one’s addiction? One of the family problems during recovery is the temptation to place the blame squarely on the shoulders of the person suffering from addiction. While it’s true the individual made a bad choice to use drugs or alcohol, continuing substance abuse is not a choice – it stems from chemical changes in the brain. It is the nature of addiction to lessen the motivation of the individual to initiate change or seek treatment when a part of them recognizes the harmful cycle.

Repairing broken relationships is part of the focus of recovery. This can only be done when the individual is clean, sober, and has the presence of mind to recognize that certain actions were harmful to others. By the same token, family members must acknowledge and take ownership of their role in the addiction.

As counseling continues, at some point, the person in recovery will get the opportunity to sit with family members and speak openly about what drove them to addiction. Family members are often shocked to learn that they weren’t there in the time of need. Those suffering from addiction are similarly shocked to learn that their families simply didn’t know what to say or do.

These sessions sometimes start off angry and confrontational but then can become healing and reinvigorating. Family problems during recovery are natural. Some family members will not like what they hear when they realize they played at least some role in the addiction. Whether it was enabling, denial, inattention, or abusive behavior, honesty and openness are necessary on both sides.

The “awakening” we see in recovering addicts is especially interesting. With all transgressions laid bare on both sides of the addiction, the true healing can begin.

Breaking Through Addiction Issues

Renaissance Recovery provides the tools needed to stop the cycle of addiction. If you’re struggling with addiction issues, our licensed therapist can help you deal with the causes in any combination of the following therapies and treatments:

Contact Renaissance Recovery by calling [Direct] to discuss therapy options to overcome family barriers during addiction treatment programs in California.

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Renaissance Recovery Coronavirus Policy Update

As the national pandemic continues to make it increasingly difficult for individuals to receive quality aftercare, The District Recovery Community & Renaissance Recovery has provided a solution to all those seeking long term care. We are proud to announce that we will be offering all aspects of our treatment including intimate groups, one on one therapy, and case management to individuals in all states from the comfort and safety of your home. This is a great option for clients that are in need of continued treatment, but are returning home to be with their families during this time.

The District Recovery Community and Renaissance Recovery will remain in operation during this time and continue to serve our mission of treating those suffering from alcoholism and addiction.

We encourage you all to reach out to learn more about how we can work together to ensure that our clients remain sober, safe, and continue to get the help that they need.